• film

UPenn Cinema Studies

Zazie dans le Metro

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Friday 10/16
8:30 pm
FREE! Please RSVP if you plan to attend

FOR FILMS AND EVENTS PRESENTED BY IHP, Tickets ARE Also Available From the IHP Box Office, which is normally open Tue-Sat from noon-8pm (or, for events outside of those times, from one hour before until one hour after the scheduled starting time).  call 215-387-5125, menu option 2. 

dir. Louis Malle, France, 1960, 35mm, 92 mins., color, French w/ English subtitles

PLEASE NOTE CHANGE OF SHOWTIME TO 8:30PM.

Introduction and post-film Q&A by Justine Malle (Louis Malle’s daughter) 


A brash and precocious ten-year-old (Catherine Demongeot) comes to Paris for a whirlwind weekend with her rakish uncle (Philippe Noiret); he and the viewer get more than they bargained for, however, in this anarchic comedy from Louis Malle, which rides roughshod over the City of Light. Based on a popular novel by Raymond Queneau that had been considered unadaptable, Malle’s audacious Zazie dans le métro, made with flair on the cusp of the French New Wave, is a bit of stream-of-consciousness slapstick, wall-to-wall with visual gags, editing tricks, and effects.


The screening of Zazie dans le Métro is part of “The Transatlantic Cinema of Louis Malle: A Critical Reassessment, 20 Years after his Death” - a symposium organized by the Romance Languages department and Cinema Studies program of the University of Pennsylvania. This academic event, which is free and open to all, takes place at the Kislak Center in Penn's Van Pelt - Dietrich Library on October 16th and 17th, and is meant to revisit the acclaimed, provocative and versatile career of the French director Louis Malle in light of national and international cinema. Once considered part of the French New Wave with his groundbreaking Elevator to the Gallow, Malle’s eclectic filmography demonstrates a strong desire to free himself and cinema, whether in fiction films or documentaries, from any social and filmic convention. Each of his films was for him a challenge to reconsider the art of the moving image offering in turn to the audience the chance to think the world through a critical lens, rarely seen elsewhere. 

This symposium was made possible by a Conference Grant from Provost’s Interdisciplinary Arts Fund and an SAS Conference Support Grant.