• film

4th Annual Blackstar Film Festival

La Belle Vie: The Good Life

Get Tickets
Friday 7/31
12:00 pm
$12 General Public
$8 Students & Seniors
$6 IHP Members
FREE IHP Residents (box office only)

FOR FILMS AND EVENTS PRESENTED BY IHP, Tickets ARE Also Available From the IHP Box Office, which is normally open Tue-Sat from noon-8pm (or, for events outside of those times, from one hour before until one hour after the scheduled starting time).  call 215-387-5125, menu option 2. 

directed by: Rachelle Salnave
Feature Documentary. Haiti, 2014, 62 min.
Trailer


La Belle Vie: The Good Life is a story about a Haitian American filmmaker’s journey to discover her Haitian roots by examining the complexities of Haitian society in light of the prevailing political and economic dichotomy in that country. Interconnecting personal family stories with the voices of other Haitians, this film examines the rational behind its social class system and how it has affected the Haitian American migration experience. This film questions whether or not the recent earthquake will motivate Haitians (living in Haiti and abroad) to unite to build a new Haiti.

 

Preceded by

Papa Machete

directed by: Jonathan David Kane
Short Documentary. USA/Haiti, 2014, 11 min.

Trailer

Papa Machete is a glimpse into the life of Alfred Avril, a poor farmer who lives in the hills of Jacmel, Haiti and who happens to be a master of the mysterious martial art of Haitian machete fencing, also known as Tire Machèt.

 

Purgatorio

directed by: Martine Jean
Short Narrative. United States, 2014, 11 min.

Trailer

In September 2013, the Dominican Republic’s top court issued a ruling that rendered tens of thousands of Dominicans of Haitian descent stateless. Many were “deported” to Haiti where they had no relatives and no resources. Families were torn apart – mothers were separated from their children, husbands from their wives,. Based on real life events, Purgatorio captures the plight of Rosa Jean-Louis and her daughter Soledad as they are transported to Haiti, explores the inhumanity of statelessness, and echoes the cries of a land beckoning its children home.